E 0728 RIFT

The word " rift " is of Germanic origin .

H 0842 ב י ר

Concept of root : rift

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ב י ר

riv

brawl, dispute, rift

Related English words

rift

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ב י ר

riv

rift

r . y . v

English

rift

rift

r (i) f t

Middle Dutch

rivel

rivel

rift, conflict

r (i) v . l

Latin

(rivalis)

rivalis

rival

r (i) v . l

 

 

Proto-Semitic *RIB --- *RĬB Proto-Germanic

 

 

This entry is strictly related to number E 0742 (Hebrew 0836) . The Hebrew root "R W B" shown there has developed into "R Y B" as seen here. The meaning is comparable.We have made two different entries because we have also found different corresponding words in English, one with the O-sound (row) and one with the I-sound (rift).

 

These parallel developments are extremely interesting and in themselves a real indication of the existing kinship between English and Hebrew.

 

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. This root or its sisters are seen in various forms and tongues. Syriac has just "ר ב , rov = he shouted, clamoured, was in uproar", things done in contending. It has also "ר ו ב א, rov'" as the related noun. Arabic " = he agitated the mind" and Akkadian "rāba, irūb = to tremble" may have those meanings as developments out of a contention or conflictuality. Proto-Semitic probably already used a predecessor of Hebrew ""*ר י ב , R Y B", besides the older form "*ר י ב , R W B".
Note:
  • English has added a T to the root, which is a not unusual way of forming an action-descriptive noun.

 

Note:
  • Dutch has extended the root, introducing an extra consonant L . It is not certain if this must be seen as an intensifying extension. It is probably so, because "rivel" , also "riveel", indicates also rather vast situations of conflict.

 

Note:
  • Latin. "Rivalis" has been adopted by many modern languages, such as in English "rival". The etymological explanation is that a "rivalis" was somebody living on a "rivus" or small stream. Consequently he was entitled to the use of this stream and its banks. This situation inevitably led to conflictuality. So the "rivalis" became somebody who has rifts. Like many etymological myths it sounds very nice, but is too far-fetched to convince.

     

    The similarity with Dutch, that has also a final L, and with Hebrew, induces us to see a possible common origin. We have applied the brackets on account of the remaining uncertainty.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic. English "rift", as no predecessor has been found in Old English, is considered to have come from Old Norse, that had the sister words "ript(noun)" and "ripta(verb)" that indicate the breaking of an agreement. These words are related to those of this entry. Proto-Germanic probably had a form "*R Ĭ B". English "rive" may be related.

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. As often, the similarity is seen between Semitic and Germanic and cognates in other branches of Indo-European seem not to be found.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 27/11/2012 at 13.03.07