E 0966 VIDEO

The English word" video " is of Latin origin

H 1029 א ד ו

Concept of root : see, ascertain and know

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

א; ד ו

א ה ד ו

א י ד ו

wid’;

wada’,

wada’i

to ascertain ;

certainty

-

Related English words

video

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

א; ד ו

א ה ד ו

א י ד ו

wid’ ;

wada’ai

wada’i

to ascertain;

certainty

-

w . d (‘)

English

video

video

v . d

Latin

videre

vidre

to see, observe , understand

v . d

Dutch

weten

wten

to know

w . t

Danish

vide

wide

to know

w . d

 

 

Proto-Semitic *WAD'À, "WID'É --- *VĪD-, *VĒD- Indo-European

 

 

To see, look, ascertain and know is a basic series of concepts that are consequentially linked. As a result we may find in different languages similar roots that cover parts of this chain of knowledge. So we have Latin videre ( see ) Hebrew wid’ ( ascertain ) and Danish vide ( know ) that cover the three links, all using the same root.

 

This entry is strictly related to entry E 1006 (Hebrew 1039), with English "wit" and Hebrew "yad’ " = "to know ". There more related words are found, as in Russian and Nordic .

 

Between the "V" in Latin "video" and Danish "vide" and the W in Hebrew "wid’" and Dutch "weten" there is a relatively not significant difference .

 

Note:
  • Hebrew. In Hebrew a Waw very often becomes a Yod. At the beginning of words we very rarily find a Waw. This entry gives one of the few exceptions and its successor of Entry E 1006 (Hebrew 1039) that begins with Yod instead of Waw is already much more important .

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. This old root "*ו ד א, *W . D . Aleph", was certainly present in Proto-Semitic. In the comparison we quote also the important version with the vowels " I " and " E ", that probably was used already in Proto-Semitic.

     

    Then there is in Hebrew a root in which the "Aleph" has been substituted by a stronger "Ayin": "*ו ד ע, *W . D . Ayin ", with a related message : "to introduce, present", registered in Medieval Hebrew, but certainly of older origin, even if not found in the written texts of the Bible. It may very well have been present in Proto-Semitic.

     

    A newer version, " י ד ע, *Y . D . Ayin " (Yod, Daleth Ayin), with initial Y instead of W, is seen in the just mentioned Hebrew verb "yad'" that stands for " to perceive, understand, know" " and is also found in Aramaic and Syriac. See the very important entry E 1006 (Hebrew 1039).

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic . The first consonant is in West Germanic languages and Gothic a "W". In North Germanic the spelling is "V", but the pronunciation is practically the same. The following consonant is a mostly long " Ī ", except in Middle Dutch, Dutch, Middle Low German and Swedish. Inh Old Swedish one finds a vowel "Ē", that can be considered a local development.

     

    The second and closing consonant is nearly always a "T", with the typically voiced "D" in Danish "vide" after Old Danish "wit" and with in another typical development German "wissen" with "SS", after the "ZZ" in its predecessor Old High German. In verbal and nominal forms other vowels can be seen, especially "EI" (German "weiss, Old Norse "veit") "Ā" (Old English wāt, wāst"), "U" (German "wusste, gewusst"). Where the basic verb has "E", also a short "I" may be found, as in Swedish "visste" and Dutch "wist". Such an "I" is as well present in English "wit".

     

    Proto-Germanic presumably had "*W Ī T-", with in verbal or nominal forms other vowels as "A", "U" , "EI".

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. In Entry E 1006 (Hebrew 1039) there is more information. We cite here just the conclusions for Indo-European

     

     

    Old Indian has "vindati = to find ", "vēda = I know" and vidyá = knowledge".

     

    Avestan shows vaēda = I know".

     

    Indo-European probably had for the logic chain of meanings that goes from "to look, see" to "to know": "*V Ī D-" , but it is possible that diversification had already taken place, with also the introduction of a different vowel, as in "*V Ē D-".

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 04/01/2013 at 17.05.16